See Christopher Marlowe's initials carved into one of the beech trees on Thomas Walsingham's Scadbury estate.

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The entrance to Scadbury, home of Thomas Walsingham at Chislehurst in Kent. Here Marlowe escaped from plague-ridden London to live with his patron that May of 1593 when he was arrested. May 20th Henry Maunder rode up this magnificent avenue, on his way to arrest Marlowe. A few hours later they rode back along this road toward London, Marlowe under arrest. Marlowe was given bail by the privy council. Marlowe is supposed to have died May 30, ten days later while still out on bail. He died right before he was to go before the Star Chamber Court, and it was almost guaranteed he was going to be tortured and possibly put to death. The Coroner's Report, not discovered until 1925, listed his killer as Ingram Frizer who was a personal employee of Thomas Walsingham and lived on the estate. After "killing" Thomas Walsingham's friend Christopher Marlowe, Frizer continued on for twenty years working for him.

It is down this Avenue the gallant retinue of Queen Elizabeth also passed in 1597 when she knighted Thomas Walsingham. It leads straight to the site of the moated 14th century fortified manor house of Scadbury, part stone, part half-timbered Tudor apartments, which constituted the Walsinghams' country seat. Even today rustic seclusion envelops Scadbury, though barely twelve miles from the centre of London on the Kentish border. The original estate comprised over one thousand acres.

 

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from A.D. Wraight's In Search of Christopher Marlowe

See Christopher Marlowe's initials carved into one of the beech trees on Thomas Walsingham's Scadbury estate.